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VERY IMPORTANT NOTICE

Homeowners / Law Enforcement / Groundskeepers / Concerned Citizens

You saw a person carrying an Iguana in your backyard, on the canal, or out on the street.  Why are they doing this?  Who owns the Canal?  Is this Legal?

LEGAL FRAMEWORK

Who owns the canals?

All canals, lakes and ponds are owned and managed by SFWMD (South Florida Water Management District)

READ MORE BELOW

Can Iguanas be hunted?

Iguanas may be humanely caught, trapped and euthanized using PCP (Pre-Charged Pneumatic) air rifles with prior notification to LEO's.

READ MORE BELOW

Why are the trappers on my property?

Trappers are not on your property, there is a 15'-40' Right-Of-Way Easement on each side of the canal.

READ MORE BELOW

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WHO OWNS THE CANALS?

Excerpted from South Florida Water Management District

The South Florida Water Management District is the largest single landowner in the region with nearly 1.5 million acres of public land within our boundaries. Our continued ability to successfully restore and manage these important natural resources is hampered by the growing presence of non-native invasive plants and animals. Non-native plants and animals often aggressively invade natural habitats and drastically alter...READ MORE

EXOTIC ANIMALS

Considerable numbers of non-native animals are known to occur throughout South Florida, ranging from approximately 55 species in the Kissimmee Basin to more than 150 species in the southern Everglades. Interagency research aims to find which animals are most threatening. Ranking animals for control is a serious challenge, and prioritizing animal-related threats is complicated by the overlapping of multiple regulatory agencies' purviews.

The Florida Fish and Wildlife Conservation Commission has an emerging exotic animal management program. The Commission coordinates with the District and other partners to manage non-native animal species in South Florida, such as the Nile monitor, Argentine tegu and purple swamp hen...  …In addition, the non-native island apple snail, green iguana, African Nile monitor lizard and the Mexican bromeliad weevil are other exotic animals of growing concern.

READ MORE

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CAN IGUANAS BE HUNTED?

Excerpted from FLORIDA WILDLIFE COMMISSION

Humane killing of captured iguanas will be the most effective option for many homeowners. Iguanas and all other wildlife are protected by anticruelty laws, and inhumane treatment of them is prohibited and punishable by state law. Inhumane treatment includes the use of poisons to kill iguanas; no poisons are legal to use on iguanas or any other reptile in Florida. Homeowners that want to humanely kill iguanas can contact local veterinarians to inquire about the cost and availability of services in their area. Homeowners that desire to kill the iguana themselves must do so humanely. Homeowners can use firearms to dispatch iguanas. However the FWC strongly recommends homeowners contact their local Sheriff’s Office to inquire about local firearm ordinances before discharging any firearms.

NOTE:  We use low power, legal air rifles in lieu of firearms.

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WHY ARE THE TRAPPERS ON MY PROPERTY?

Excerpted from South Florida Water Management District

What is District Right of Way? For purposes of the South Florida Water Management District (the “District”), “right of way” is the collective term used to describe those properties or facilities that have been designated as “Works of the District” by the District’s Governing Board. The most common rights of way are those lands associated with canals and levees and in which the District has a fee (outright ownership) or easement (subject to someone else owning the property) interest. For homeowners, right of way typically exists as the publicly-owned land between the rear property line and the canal or as an easement over the homeowners’ property lying adjacent to a canal. … READ MORE

https://www.sfwmd.gov/sites/default/files/documents/right_of_way_faqs.pdf

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Typical easement behind properties, adjacent to the canal.